Home 主页 // Viewpoints 观点

Chinese Succession and Chinese Foreign Policy

Chinese Succession and Chinese Foreign Policy
Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on CNN’s website on April 19, 2012. It can be found here. It is reprinted here with the authors’ permission. By Neil K. Shenai & Bernard Geoxavier Two weeks ago, Chinese President Hu Jintao published an editorial in The People’s Liberation Army Daily reaffirming the PLA’s loyalty to the Chinese Communist Party. His article... 

Bo Xilai and the Politics of Chinese Succession

Bo Xilai and the Politics of Chinese Succession
Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on CNN’s website on March 28, 2012. It can be found here. It is reprinted here with the authors’ permission. By Neil K. Shenai & Bernard Geoxavier On March 15, the Chinese Communist Party announced the removal of Chongqing Party Chief Bo Xilai, a popular ‘Princeling’ leader, famous for his anti-corruption efforts and dogged support... 

“You All Like to Eat This”: Responding to Chinese People Saying You Can’t Eat Chinese Food

By: Hannah Lincoln A Chinese person asking me if I’m used to using chopsticks and eating Chinese food has always been a sure way to tick me off, especially if that conversation is in Chinese. You would figure they would know that if I speak Chinese, I must have been studying at least a few years, and that in those few years, I would have to have eaten to survive. And in the unlikely scenario... 
Tags: ,

Why Chinese Succession Matters

Why Chinese Succession Matters
By Bernard Geoxavier and Neil K. Shenai Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on CNN’s website on March 14, 2012. It can be found here. It is reprinted here with the authors’ permission. On Wednesday, March 14th, the Chinese Communist Party reaffirmed that Xi Jinping would succeed Hu Jintao as the Party’s General Secretary and seventh President of the People’s Republic... 

Ma La Tang: It Hurts That Good

Ma La Tang: It Hurts That Good
As a student at Beijing Foreign Language University (Bei Wai), I avoided Ma La Tang like the plague.  The problem was: that plague looked mighty fun.  For the uninitiated, Ma La Tang is a customer chosen concoction of vegetables, noodles, tofu, meatballs, and whatever else your procurer of Ma La Tang goodies happens to have on stock, all of which are boiled in some kind of liquid, and served to the... 

Still Waiting for the Bus

Still Waiting for the Bus
In contrast to dazzling rail projects, China’s urban bus transit remains a neglected area   China is investing billions in flashy new rail networks. Nevertheless the vast majority of China’s urban population still relies on public buses as the main mode for getting around, but they see far fewer of the upgrades in speed and conditions enjoyed by rail passengers. Whereas rich cities like Beijing,...